Category Archives: Uncategorized

Happy World Water Day 2016: Water and Jobs


Image courtesy of UN-Water

Tomorrow, Tuesday, March 22, 2016 is this year’s World Water Day, the theme of which is water and jobs. The inter-agency group UN-Water sets the theme every year, this year in coordination with the International Labour Organization (ILO) and other partners.

Here’s a short list of informative websites that can shed more light on the day, the theme, the celebrations and more:

UN-Water: World Water Day

Latest UN data on water and jobs

World Water Day: What’s it about?

Interactive World Water Day website

Official World Water Day 2016 Event in Geneva, Switzerland

Water Integrity Global Outlook 2016 (WIGO)

On Twitter: #WorldWaterDay

Related posts:

17 Sustainable Development Goals Adopted at the UN

World Water Day: UN World Water Development Report Warns of Global Crisis by 2030


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Citing Health Risks, Cuomo Bans Fracking in New York State


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December 18, 2014 · 9:41 am

If You Could Advise the UN on Water, What Would You Say?

Image: United Nations

Image: United Nations

The Guardian, known for some of the best environmental reporting coming out of the U.K., posed a question to a bevy of experts in honor of World Water Day 2014, on March 22: “What one piece of advice would you give the UN on water?” More specifically, how should water fit into the post-2015 development agenda? Following up on my recent World Water Day posts below, here’s a link to the answers given by the water wonks from the worlds of business, NGOs and government.

There’s broad agreement among the experts that there should be specific water and sanitation Sustainable Development Goals, just as there was enthusiastic agreement at the UN briefing I recently attended at the WMO in Geneva, Switzerland. Water will be frequently mentioned among other goals because it connects everything, but mere mentions here and there won’t be enough to give the world the clean water and effective sanitation that so many people lack.

Read more:

What one piece of advice would you give the UN on water?  – The Guardian Water hub

Related posts:

Water’s Place Among Post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals

At the Point of ‘Peak Water,’ Our Foreseeable Future Grows Shorter

UNICEF Says Put Down Your Cell Phone for a Few Minutes to Help Kids Get Water

Mapping the World’s Most Water-Stressed Countries

The Intersection of Environmental Issues and Human Rights

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Filed under Africa, Blog Changes and Updates, Bottled Water, Caribbean, Dams and Hydropower, Industry, Science, Space, Uncategorized, Wastewater Treatment

Groups Slap Nestle’s Human Rights Assessment as ‘PR Stunt’

Image: Nestle S.A.

Image: Nestle S.A.

Several non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are criticizing Nestlé’s recently released human rights impact report as a PR stunt that overlooks the human right to water, among other allegations, reports Caroline Scott-Thomas of

Vevey, Switzerland-based Nestlé, the world’s largest food company, had trumpeted that its report, released just before International Human Rights Day, was the first of its kind from a multinational corporation. It’s called “Talking the Human Rights Walk: Nestlé’s Experience Assessing Human Rights Impacts in its Business Activities.” The company’s partner in the research, the Danish Institute for Human Rights, referred to the report as a “breakthrough.”

According to Nestle, the paper “focuses on actions Nestlé has taken to improve its human rights performance at both country operations and corporate level,” and assesses data from Angola, Colombia, Kazakhstan, Nigeria, Russia, Sri Lanka, and Uzbekistan.

Certain NGOs see it as little more than window dressing on the company’s reputation. Among charges surfaced in the article: The report is selective, with a limited scope and significant omissions, and that it looks at corporate policy rather than practice. The NGOs concerned are Blue Planet Project,  FIVAS, Food and Water Watch, and Public Services International. Nestlé says it rejects the NGOs’ criticisms.

This is far from the first time Nestlé has come under fire from NGOs and other organizations. Frequently cited as the world’s largest producer of bottled water, it has been criticized for wanting to privatize water (which it denies). The company has gone to court in several places, opposed by groups trying to defend regional groundwater from being taken and sold elsewhere at a profit to others.

To those who see water a human right in a world where hundreds of millions of human don’t have enough of it, the idea of water as a commodity sold for profit by corporations seems wrong.  Several documentary films have tackled the subject, including Tapped,  Bottled Life: The Truth About Nestle’s Business With Water, and Blue Gold: World Water Wars. For the record,  Nestlé Chairman Peter Brabeck-Letmathe has said that he believes water is a human right. But in the recent past, he struck a different tone.

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Filed under Africa, Asia, Human rights, Research, South America, Sustainability, Uncategorized, Water Resources, Water Shortage